Nude photographs of more than 100 celebrities stored in iCloud leaked

Jennifer Lawrence leaked iCloud images
Jennifer Lawrence leaked iCloud images

Trust celebrities to store their sensitive photographs on a cloud service. And then they complain that their privacy is being invaded. More than 100 celebrities including the likes of Jennifer Lawrence, Ariana Grande, Victoria Justice and Kate Upton had their photographs stolen from their iCloud accounts and posted all over the Internet.

This is a strange fetish these days among people to click their nude photographs. It’s a personal matter actually, but the problem is, 99% of these people have no idea how to safeguard such sensitive images and stop them from getting in wrong hands. There is a big market for such leaked photographs. Sometimes these photographs are purposely leaked (for publicity) and sometimes they are simply stolen after hacking into smartphones, computers and laptops and now, services like iCloud, which is an Apple alternative to cloud storage services like Google Drive and Dropbox. Although according to various media reports the phones were hacked, but the meta data, according to this TechChrunch report, shows that the images were taken from iCloud. Subsequently people are questioning iCloud’s ability to keep your data safe.

If you switch on the feature your smartphone automatically uploads the photographs you click to your preferred cloud storage device. For instance, I upload all my photographs to Dropbox automatically. This way all our family devices are connected to my account and whoever clicks a photograph, the photograph is immediately uploaded to my Dropbox account and via that, onto my computer. Of course no one in his or her right mind will click a nude photograph of himself or herself (I hope so) in my family. iCloud has the same feature. I don’t know if this feature is turned on by default or not because in Dropbox it is not. You have to manually go to the settings (or at the time of installation it asks you) and do it. This might be a problem if the software asks at the time of installation because people are prone to clicking “Yes” in a hurry to install a particular application. In any case, check out your iCloud settings in case you think your photographs are being automatically uploaded.

Cloud storage devices are a great way of syncing your data over devices, but people shouldn’t store sensitive information using these services simply because they’re not as careful as, let us say a person who knows the risks involved fully. These services should be restricted to storing casual documents, casual image files, music files and movie videos. Don’t keep your sensitive photographs even on your phones because phones are very easy to hack into. The best is, keep all your photographs that show you in your birthday suit or doing crazy stuff in your bedroom either in a properly secured computer (it doesn’t harm to hire a professional) or a hard drive that is kept in a safe. This advice is not applicable to you if you want your photographs to be leaked.

According to this update, Apple seems to have patched the security flaw that was responsible for the hacking of the nude photographs.

About Amrit Hallan
Amrit Hallan is the founder of TechBakBak.com. He writes about technology not because "he loves to write about technology", he actually believes that it makes the world a better place. On Twitter you can follow him at @amrithallan

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